Articles - 1950 Oldsmobile 88
11/28/2013
This car weighed 3616 pounds and had a V8. Release 5 of M2's Auto-thentics has two models in it that fit my 1950 layout. This model is of a 1950 Oldsmobile 88. This is too new for the layout, so it will most likely be set up in a car dealership. These cars seem to have a problem completely closing the hood. The model seems to be a fairly accurate one.
1950 Oldsmobile 88
Shown here in another color, the model's doors open, as well, and the wheels roll.
1950 Oldsmobile 88
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I wanted to install SMD (surface mount) LEDs into this model. These are tiny, but extremely bright LEDs. The particular ones I am using in this model are Miniatronics part #12-625-04, but you can get these LEDs anywhere nowadays. This package comes with four SMD LEDs and eight resistors (four each of two different values for two different voltage supplies). The underframe of the car can be removed by removing the one screw. A lip in the back holds it in place, so once the screw is removed, the underframe can be removed. The headlights of the model have clear plastic "glass", so it is a simple matter of gluing an LED behind the glass. Of course, "simple" is understating it, because the plastic is curved and the LED is square. However, with a bit of fiddling it is doable. I started using canopy glue, but that turned into a disaster. The glue won't hold to the metal body. I then used superglue, which worked fine. As you may notice in the first photo, I unsoldered the wires that come attached to the LEDs, and replaced them with Ngineering's #38 magnet wire. The original wires are way too thick to work with under the car. The magnet wire works great and can easily be manipulated to prevent it from being seen. I have not yet glued the wire to the body, which will come later. I used a 15-watt soldering iron when soldering to the LEDs. I superglued a resistor to the underside of the inside plastic cabin part. I then soldered the positive (red) magnet wire from the LEDs to the resistor. A common wire comes from the other lead of the LEDs.
1950 Oldsmobile 88
I routed the two magnet wires through a screw opening in the car's underframe (there are two such holes which were originally used to hold the car to the original packaging). This photo shows the lights with no camera flash.
1950 Oldsmobile 88
This photo shows the lights at a lower angle but with the camera flash. The LEDs were powered with a 9V battery. There is some space behind the back seat area of the plastic interior, so I am trying to find a 3V battery that can be used to power the LEDs so that there's no need for external power. The rear lights on the model do not use a see-through piece of plastic, so to be able to make those, I will have drill out some holes in the body, install the LEDs and paint a red cover. This will be done in the future.
1950 Oldsmobile 88
This is a model by Johnny Lightning, as part of their Release 21. It seems to be a close match to the prototype 88, as compared to the M2 version (which may be an "LE" variety). The model's wheels roll, but neither the doors nor the hood/trunk open. It measures 16-1/3 feet long, 6-1/3 feet wide, and stands 5 feet tall.
1950 Oldsmobile 88
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This is an M2 version that was part of their Release 18. It has an alder green metallic finish. Very nice model. I bought mine from Sidetracks.
1950 Oldsmobile 88