Articles - PRR Chartiers Branch
03/05/2016

Introduction

This section of my web site contains all the prototype research information I have collected about the Pennsylvania Railroad's Chartiers Branch. Please note that I have no first-hand knowledge of this area. All information posted here is just from my own personal research. Please check the References section at the bottom of this page for the sources from which I have gathered my information. Do not use this web site as a primary source for research information; maybe just as a starting point if you are interested in this branch line.

The purpose of the Chartiers Branch was to connect Washington, Pennsylvania to the PRR's main line in Carnegie, Pennsylvania. It is a 23-mile branch that has a southwesterly/northeasterly direction in the area southwest of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The branch was named after the Chartiers creek, which it follows and crosses a number of times. The Chartiers Creek flows north/northeasterly and empties into the Ohio River just west of Pittsburgh. The name "Chartiers" came from a half-French, half-Native American who settled near the watershed of the Chartiers Creek and built himself a trading post.

The map shown below is a portion of the one that came in The Keystone Vol.48 No.4. It is dated November 1941, and is from Chuck Blardone's collection. The red lines are the PRR's Panhandle Division, the green line the Waynesburg & Washington RR, the thick black lines are other PRR divisions, and the thinner black lines are other railroads. The Chartiers Branch is the red line from Carnegie to Washington, and is labeled the "P.C.C. & St.L. R.R."
PRR Chartiers Branch
In this map I have labeled some of the key points along the Chartiers Branch. It is also dated November 1941. Follow the heavy black line down through Bridgeville, Canonsburg, and down to Washington. That is the Chartiers Branch itself. Although much of the Chartiers Branch appeared to be double-tracked back then, it was actually two railroads providing each other trackage rights. One was owned by the Pennsylvania Railroad (PCC & StL) and the other was owned by the Pittsburgh, Chartiers & Youghiogheny Rwy (PC&Y). As if that wasn't enough coverage, the Pittsburgh & West Virginia (PWV) paralleled the Chartiers Branch from Carnegie to Bridgeville up to about a couple of hundred yards away and about 50 to 100 feet up (the PRR Chartiers Branch was in the valley by the creek, and the P&WV line was up on the ridge, so to say). There was also a trolley line paralleling the Branch along much of its length. In the diagram there are two labels "start" and "end" "of modeled area". This was for my first S-scale layout, so just ignore that.
PRR Chartiers Branch

Branches

The Chartiers Branch itself had two branches. The first one, The Bridgeville & McDonald branch, broke off the Chartiers Branch at Bridgeville. It served the Bishop (located near Venice) and Creedmore coal mines. It was abandoned in 1942, due to mine closures.

The Westland Branch broke off the Chartiers Branch at Houston, PA, to serve the Westland coal mine. The Westland Branch itself had a two-mile branch to Palanka to serve its namesake mine. The Westland, and therefore the Palanka, branch was abandoned in 1955 due to the closures of the mines they served.

Connections With Other Railroads

External Reference:
The Pittsburgh & West Virginia Railroad connected to the Bridgeville & McDonald Branch just outside of Bridgeville.

At Bridgeville the PRR interchanged traffic with the Norfolk & Western.

In 1946 the Pennsylvania Railroad and the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie railroad (a subsidiary of the New York Central RR) became co-owners of the coal-hauler the Montour Railroad. At Hills, PA (just north of Canonsburg) the Montour interchange provided lots of coal to the Chartiers Branch. The Montour RR also interchanged traffic at McDonald with the PRR. The Montour RR had about 40 miles of track that roughly circled the west side of Pittsburgh, PA. It used 2-8-0 and 2-8-2 steam engines, which were later replaced by the 1200hp SW9 EMD diesel engines. The linked-to web site is also a great reference for seeing how the Chartiers Branch ties into the Montour and other railroads. The book "Mid-Sized and Manageable Track Plans" by Iain Rice describes how to build a 12'x12' HO-scale layout based on the Montour, which includes several prototype photos.

The Chartiers Branch connected with the Tylerdale Connecting RR at Tylerdale, PA (north-west of Washington, PA). This is better seen in the map at the top of this page. This line was co-owned by the PRR and the Baltimore & Ohio. It provided an interchange with the B&O and was a tremendous source of coal transportation.

At Washington, PA, the Chartiers Branch connected with the PRR-owned Waynesburg & Washington RR, which was a narrow gauge line until 1944 when it was upgraded to standard gauge. It then became the "Waynesburg Secondary", which never really provided anything more than some passenger service. (source of photo from prr_panhandle_pa Yahoo! group contribution)
PRR Chartiers Branch

The Industries Served

Up until the late 1940s, there was a large volume of passenger traffic. In the early 1900s, a railroad employee counted a total of 130 trains in a 24-hour period on the branch! Before WWII, there were nine regularly-scheduled passenger trains every day, 10 on both Thursday and Friday, and 11 on Saturday. However, the vast majority of traffic on the line was, coal! The Chartiers Branch served 25 mines in 1916, as well as received much coal from the other railroad connections. Heavy industries later developed along the line, which included steel plants, glass plants, brick works, lumber mills, chemical companies, mills, a transformer manufacturer, a bridge manufacturer, and various other manufacturing facilities. Coal deliveries were made to power houses along the line as well. Passenger trains, before they were eliminated, also carried milk from the farms in Northern Washington county. All of these loaded cars were heading toward Pittsburgh to be distributed from there to their final destinations. (source of photo from prr_panhandle_pa Yahoo! group contribution)
PRR Chartiers Branch

Motive Power on the Branch

Steam engines started being phased out around 1948 and were completely gone by 1953, according to people who lived in the area. Locals remember seeing Baldwin, EMD, and Fairbanks-Morse diesel switchers, however cab (e.g. Alco F's) or hood (e.g. EMD GP's) units were very seldom seen on the branch. This is what I have been able to determine so far as to what was used for motive power:

4-6-0 (class G5)
Used for lighter freight and regular passenger trains.

4-6-2 (class K4)
Used for heavier, special-occasion, passenger trains.

2-8-0 (class H10)
Used for heavier freight.

2-8-2 (class L1)
Used for heavier freight.

2-10-0 (class I1)
Used for heavy freight, mostly coal drags. Photographic evidence of a train double-headed by two I1 engines appeared in The Keystone (Vol. 48, No. 1).

A Switcher
Apparently there was a switcher at Canonsburg to help out with local switching work. At some point the steam engine was replaced with a diesel switcher. I have found no information as to which type of locomotives were used at this location.

(source of photo of PRR 2-8-0 #7537 from the author's collection)
PRR Chartiers Branch

Cars

Lots of coal cars, such as H21a hoppers and GLa gondolas (not only for coal, but also for scrap and source materials). Lots of outside-braced, mostly wooden boxcars. Flat cars and depressed-center flat cars were used by the Pennsylvania Transformer company and by companies shipping odd-sized or over-sized items (with idler cars). Tank cars were rare, and refrigerator and stock cars were never observed on the line. Cabin cars observed were N5b, N5c, N6b, and N8. All according to eye-witnesses. (source of photo of PRR X26 from the author's collection)
PRR Chartiers Branch

Scenic Views

The track started at 770 feet above sea level in Carnegie and terminated at Washington at 1060 feet. Most grades were less than 1%. The reason why I became interested in this branch was the fact that it crossed the Chartiers Creek 19 times in the 23 miles, and it included one 500-foot long tunnel. Outside of the towns the scenery is mostly rolling hills with lots of wooded areas; just my cup of tea.

The following trees can be found in the general area: bigtooth aspen, black walnut, american beech, white oak, pin oak, american elm, yellow poplar, sycamore, red maple, american basswood, green ash, eastern red cedar, norway spruce.

History

First, a preliminary note about Pennsylvania companies. The Pennsylvania legislature (especially in the 1700s and 1800s) decided whether or not a company could be formed or chartered. If a company's purpose was to serve the public, some public funding could be made available, or could be raised. Usually local communities, which would be positively affected by the chartered company, would financially participate in the venture, usually by buying shares in the company. This, plus the company's private funding, would provide the finances for the company to start its projects.

1831

External Reference:
The Washington & Pittsburgh Railroad Company was chartered on March 18, 1831 to connect Washington, PA to Pittsburgh, PA. Following the Chartiers creek was deemed to be the easiest route between the two cities. The company wasn't able to collect enough money to build the line.

1837

Another Washington & Pittsburgh Railroad Company charter was created, but, again, came up short. The Baltimore & Ohio RR was actively trying to discourage the building of the line, because it already had a nearby track. No work was done on the line up to this point in time. A subsequent effort in 1846 also failed.

1853

The Chartiers Valley Railroad Company was chartered on February 7, 1853, "to construct a railroad from the city of Pittsburgh, in the county of Allegheny, by way of Canonsburg to the borough of Washington, in Washington County", with funding provided by shares sold to the various cities. However, after three years already $250,000 was spent of the $500,000 budget, with an estimated $382,000 still needed to complete the line. The company declared bankruptcy in 1857. In 1866 the assets were sold to the Pennsylvania Railroad for a bit over $45,000!

1870

The PRR, via the Chartiers Valley Railway, began construction from Mansfield (now Carnegie) toward Washington, PA. Passenger service to and from Canonsburg started on December 19, 1870. On May 18, 1871 the entire line from Mansfield to Washington was completed, 40 years after the initial survey. Traffic included passenger service, agricultural products, and coal. At the time, on average the 23-mile branch line carried 4,500 passenger per day, with special events drawing as many as 10,000.

1871

On December 8, 1871 the Chartiers Valley Railway was leased to the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railway (PC&StL), which officially named the line the "Chartiers Branch".

1877

External Reference:
In 1875 the Waynesburg & Washington Railroad was organized to build a narrow-gauge (3-foot) railway between Washington and Waynesburg, a stretch of 28.16 miles. Although not officially a part of the Chartiers Branch, its significance is that in Washington it paralleled the Chartiers Branch at the passenger station to allow passengers to transfer between the lines. The narrow-gauge line was completed in November 1877.

1890

The branch line from Bridgeville to Cecil and Bishop was built. The Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and St. Louis Railway (PC&StL) became the Pittsburgh, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad (a.k.a. "Panhandle", PCC&StL). Still owned by the PRR.
PRR Chartiers Branch

1902

The most congested part of the line was double-tracked, between Houston and Carnegie, completed in March 1904.

1904

The branch lines to Westland and Palanka, and another to Manifold were built.

1909

Canonsburg's brick passenger station was completed.

1935

External Reference:
On January 18, 1935 the PRR petitions for the abandonment of the portion of the Bridgeville & McDonald Branch from Cecil to its terminus in Allegheny County, a distance of 1.87 miles.

1943

External Reference:
The PRR petitions for the abandonment of the portion of the Bridgeville & McDonald Branch between Gladden and its terminus, a distance of 0.57 miles, and the so-called Millers Run Extension extending from Cecil to Bishop, a distance of 1.10 miles.

1944

The Waynesburg & Washington Railroad was upgraded to standard gauge, and was renamed the Waynesburg Secondary.

1948

Reportedly the first diesel engines appeared on the Branch.

1952

July 30, 1952: passenger service to Washington ceased (powered by PRR K4 #3849). Steam engines were still being used for the service and they looked really badly maintained and/or dirty, due to their inevitable replacement. Most double-tracked rail was replaced with single-track.

1955

The Westland Branch was closed due to the closing of its namesake mine.

1959

The branch had become very profitable for the Pennsylvania Railroad because of coal found in the region and subsequent industries which developed along the line from the late 1800s through World War II. After that, however, due to competing road traffic, the line began to decline. Finally in 1959, the PRR abandoned the connection with the mainline to the Chartiers Branch altogether. The Washington Secondary, the new name of the branch, became a branch off of the Scully Branch.

1968

On February 1, 1968 the bankrupt Pennsylvania Railroad, New York Central, and New Haven railroads were merged into Penn Central.

1972

External Reference:
The Fulton Flood Protection Project was made law in 1965. By 1972 the Chartiers Creek was modified and enhanced to reduce the damage caused by the nearly annual flooding of many communities along the creek.

1976

The Penn Central pretty much ignored the line. On April 1, 1976 Conrail was formed from the Penn Central and several other bankrupt railroads.

1982

Conrail ceased operating the branch west of Tylerdale (MP 21.8), and it was renamed the Canonsburg Industrial Track.

1994

The branch was put up for sale.

1996

External Reference:
RailTex, based in San Antonio, Texas, bought the line and renamed it the Pittsburgh Industrial Railroad. RailTex specialized in buying unprofitable short-line railroads, and making the lines profitable. This was primarily done by making sure they only bought lines that were not unionized. The company was started in 1979 and went public in 1993.

2000

External Reference:
RailTex was merged into RailAmerica, Inc, which later that year sold the line to the Ohio Central Railroad System. The OCRS, whose purpose it is to connect industries to Class I railroads via previously-existing short-lines, formed the Pittsburgh & Ohio Centrail Railroad (POHC) which then took over ownership of the line. The owner of OCRS is a railfan, and he enjoyed restoring and running older vintage diesel engines on his lines.

2008

External Reference:
The Ohio Central Railroad System was bought by Genesee & Wyoming, Inc. in 2008. This is where the line stands as of today. The POHC, which remains the operator of the line, owns two SW1500 engines and a GP11 (a 1957-built former GP9), and still runs trains once a day Monday through Friday on the line.

Track Plan

I've spent quite a bit of time developing the track scheme shown below. There is also a full-size version available. Each horizontal line is 6,400 feet (1.21 miles). The intent behind this diagram was to see what it would take for me to fully model this branch line in S-scale (1:64). So, the reason for the length is that I made each horizontal line 100 real-world feet, and each vertical bar is 2 feet. Each orange dot is a stop marked on the PRR Track Chart. The bold names (above an orange dot) are the towns. The light gray text (below the orange dot) are other marked stops. Passing sidings are indicated, but not indicative of their position relative to the track. The blue numbers indicate mileposts, as measured from the Carnegie mainline (these are still a work-in-progress).

Needless to say, if I were to actually build something like this, the "vertical" sections would be more like six feet instead of two (turn-back loops). Also there is a substantial distance of just "scenery" between the Hills station (except the Montour Colliery) and the Morganza station, which could be skipped when modeled. Not shown are the branches and extended spurs that deviate away from the branch line.

The purpose of this diagram is just to visualize how far certain interesting spots were away from each other. On my to-do list for this diagram are to finish the milepost indicators, to add the various bridge crossings, and to mark off where the tunnel is located.
PRR Chartiers Branch
Below is a complete listing of the stops (shown in the schematics above) as found on the PRR C.T. 1000 May 1, 1945. I have included the actual prototype distances, and then those distances converted to S-scale. The individual branches off of the Chartiers branch are listed near the bottom (there are links to them).


Actual
1/64
Description

Carnegie, PA

0.0
0'0"
main line junction

0.1
8'3"
station

0.1
8'3"
Raskin Lumber Co.

0.2
17'6"
freight house

0.3
25'9"
Gordon Lubricating Co.

0.4
33'
"KY" Junction #1

0.4
33'
P.C.&Y. Railway connection

0.8
66'
storage

1.0
83'6"
Glenn passenger station (no siding)

1.0
83'6"
junction main line (no siding)

Leasdale, PA

1.6
132'
station

Woodville, PA

1.8
149'6"
station

1.8
149'6"
P.C.&Y. Railway connection

Bower Hill, PA

2.5
206'3"
J.B. Sipe & Company

2.7
223'9"
station

Kirwan, PA

3.1
256'9"
Universal Cyclops Steel Corp.

3.1
256'9"
Flannery Bolt Company; has P.C.&Y. Railway connection

3.1
256'9"
F.C. Mayer Mfg. Co.

3.1
256'9"
Vanadium Corporation of America

3.3
272'3"
station (no siding)

3.3
272'3"
General Electric Co.; Bridgeville Glass Works; has P.C.&Y. Railway connection

Bridgeville, PA

3.7
305'3"
Silhol Lumber & Supply Co.

3.8
314'6"
freight station

3.8
314'6"
"BD" block station

3.8
314'6"
junction with Bridgeville & McDonald branch (no siding) - see below

3.9
322'3"
passenger station

3.9
322'3"
passing siding - no carload delivery

5.6
462'6"
National Slope Colliery - H.C. Frick Coke Co.

MayView, PA

6.4
528'6"
station

7.1
586'3"
Mayview State Hospital - power house

7.1
586'3"
passing siding (no carload delivery)

Boyce, PA

7.5
619'3"
station (see Chartiers Valley Flyer DVD)

7.7
635'3"
passing siding (no carload delivery)

7.8
644'6"
passing siding (no carload delivery)

Hills, PA

8.3
685'9"
Montour Railway connection

8.4
693'
passing siding (no carload delivery)

8.5
701'3"
station

8.8
726'
Montour Colliery No. 4 - Pittsburgh Coal Co.

Morganza, PA

12.5
1031'9"
station

12.7
1048'3"
Pennsylvania Training School - power house

Richfol, PA

13.1
1081'3"
passenger station (no passing siding)

13.1
1081'3"
Aluminum Corp. of America

13.1
1081'3"
Magnolia Colliery - Chartiers Gas Coal Co.

13.?
1081'?
Pennsylvania Transformer Company (north)

Canonsburg, PA

13.6
1122'6"
Hazel Mine

13.7
1130'9"
Fort Pitt Bridge Works (south)

13.7
1130'9"
Canonsburg Pottery Co.

13.7
1130'9"
M.L. Taylor Estate

14.0
1155'6"
Canonsburg Milling Co.

14.1
1163'9"
Donaldson Supply & Equipment Co.

14.1
1163'9"
station

14.3
1180'3"
Canonsburg Steel & Iron Works

14.3
1180'3"
Hardy & Ranking

14.5
1196'9"
Altmans Cash Feed Store

14.5
1196'9"
M. Rom & Sons No. 1

Houston, PA

14.9
1229'9"
W.S. George Pottery Co.

14.9
1229'9"
McFarlane Colliery - Robert McFarlane

14.9
1229'9"
Vitro Mfg. Co.

15.1
1246'3"
storage on siding (no carload delivery)

15.2
1254'6"
"Houston" tower

15.2
1254'6"
junction with Westland branch - see below; elev. 946ft

15.3
1262'3"
station

15.3
1262'3"
Boyd Colliery - R.W. Boyd

15.8
1304'6"
passing siding (no carload delivery)

16.0
1321'
station

16.2
1337'6"
Lindley Colliery - Pittsburgh Coal Co.

Meadowlands, PA

17.9
1477'9"
station

18.0
1485
junction with Meadowlands and Zediker siding - see below

18.4
1518'
passing siding (no carload delivery)

18.4
1518'
Rich Hill Colliery - McClane Mining Co.

19.0
1568'6"
Enterprise Colliery - Springer Coal Co.

19.4
1601'
Pyramid Oil Co.

Arden, PA

19.9
1642'3"
station

Washington, PA

20.6
1700'
Sims Lumber Co.

Tylerdale, PA

21.1
1741'3"
F.J. Krees Box Co.

21.1
1741'3"
Protected Steel Products Co.

21.5
1774'3"
Washington Colliery - Hillman Coal Co.

21.6
1782'6"
B&O R.R. connection via Tylerdale Connecting Railroad

21.7
1790'9"
Dunbar & Wallace Lumber Co.

21.8
1799'
station

Washington, PA

22.0
1815'6"
O'Brien Steel Construction Co.

22.0
1815'6"
I. Richman & Co. No. 1

22.0
1815'6"
Russell Bros.

22.1
1823'9"
Fair Grounds

22.1
1823'9"
Sinclair Refining Co. No. 1

22.2
1832'
Duncan & Miller Glass Company

22.2
1832'
Star Foundry Co.

22.2
1832'
Household Products Co.

22.2
1832'
Albert Packing Co.

22.2
1832'
I. Richman & Co. No. 2

22.4
1848'6"
McVehil Plumbing Co.

22.5
1856'9"
City Coal Co.

22.5
1856'9"
Atlantic Refining Co.

22.5
1856'9"
Keystone Builders Supply Co.

22.6
1865'
Washington Ice Co.

22.6
1865'
W.A. Litle Lumber Co.

22.6
1865'
team tracks

22.7
1873'3"
freight station

22.7
1873'3"
passenger station Chestnut Street

22.7
1873'3"
M. Rom & Sons No. 2

22.7
1873'3"
Pennsylvania Mgr. Co.

22.8
1881'6"
Mississippi Glass Co.

23.0
1898'6"
engine house

23.3
1922'3"
Hazel-Atlas Glass Co. No. 1 Plant

23.5
1939'9"
Main Street station

23.5
1939'9"
P.C.C.&St.L. R.R. - end of main track

23.6
1947'
Judson Wiley & Sons

23.6
1947'
Hazel-Atlas Glass Co. No. 2 Plant


Bridgeville & McDonald Branch

Distance measured from Chartiers Branch junction.


Actual
1/64
Description

Bridgeville, PA

0.0
0'0"
station

0.0
0'0"
J.H. Lutz

0.5
41'3"
crosses "Chartiers Creek"

0.7
58'9"
Pittsburgh & West Virginia Ry. Co. interchange tracks, siding with two tracks, last goes to PWVA

0.8
66'
Ada Biron (coal mine?), trailing point left side

0.8
66'
Limestone Products Co.

1.0
83'6"
crosses "Millers Run" creek (which then flows into the Chartiers creek)

1.2
99'
crosses "Millers Run" tributary; elev. 828ft

1.4
116'6"
National Colliery - H.C. Frick Coke Co., siding, left, three tracks

Sygan, PA

1.5
124'9"
station

1.6
132'
Pittsburgh & West Virginia Ry. Co. track-level crossing (right to left)

Morgan, PA

2.4
198'
station

2.4
198'
crosses "Millers Run" tributary

Treveskyn, PA

3.0
248'6"
station (this is on a passing siding)

3.3
272'3"
crosses "Millers Run" tributary

3.4
281'6"
Vulcan Colliery - Alex McLean Mining Co.; siding, right, two tracks and small spur

3.4
281'6"
crosses "Millers Run" tributary

3.5
289'9"
crosses "Millers Run" tributary

3.8
314'6"
P.&W.VA. R.R. crosses over track on bridge (left to right); elev. 890ft

Gladden, PA

4.3
355'3"
station; elev. 910ft

4.7
388'3"
Leonard DeSmet Lumber Co.; facing point right spur

Cecil, PA

5.3
437'9"
station

5.3
437'9"
junction with Miller's Run extension

5.3
437'9"
junction with B&M branch

5.3
437'9"
station

Bishop, PA

6.4
528'6"
end Miller's Run extension

6.7
553'3"
end of Bridgeville & McDonald Branch


Westland Branch

Distance measured from Chartiers Branch junction.


Actual
1/64
Description

Houston, PA

0.0
0'0"
"Houston" tower; elev. 946ft

0.1
8'3"
junction with Palanka branch - see below

0.1
8'3"
station

0.3
25'9"
C.L. Reed Lumber Co.

0.3
25'9"
crosses "Chartiers Run" (creek)

2.8
231'
crosses "Chartiers Run"

3.5
289'9"
crosses "Chartiers Run" tributary; elev. 989ft

Brevard, PA

3.8
314'6"
station

3.8
314'6"
Rae Coal Co.

3.8
314'6"
Indyke Construction Co.

3.9
322'3"
crosses "Chartiers Run"; elev. 994ft

Westland, PA

4.6
380'
station

4.6
380'
crosses "Chartiers Run"

4.8
396'6"
crosses "Chartiers Run"

5.0
413'
end of track Westland branch

5.3
437'9"
end of Westland branch right of way; elev. 1018ft


Palanka Branch

Distance measured from Westland Branch junction. Runs northwest off of the Westland Branch.


Actual
1/64
Description

Houston, PA

0.2
17'6"
W.M. Templeton & Sons Grain Elevator

0.3
25'9"
Cummins spur

1.1
91'9"
passing siding (no carload delivery)

Palanka, PA

1.4
116'6"
Midland Colliery - Pittsburgh Coal Co.

1.7
140'3"
end of Palanka branch


Meadowlands and Zediker Siding

Distance measured from Chartiers Branch junction.


Actual
1/64
Description

Houston, PA

1.7
140'3"
end of Meadowlands and Zediker siding

References

Recollections/Stories

"Memories of the Chartiers Branch around Canonsburg" by Joseph Andrews.
"Canonsburg's Prosperity Arrived by Railroad" by James T. Herron, Jr.
"Chartiers Branch Remembered" by Kevin Trichtinger.
"Chartiers Notes" by Frank Stingone.
"History of Houston, Pennsylvania" by Earle R. Forrest.
"Thomas Yates Obituary" (first engineer on the Chartiers Branch).
"Guide: Chartier's Branch".

Books

"Canonsburg Reflections 1802-2002" by James T. Herron, Jr.

Magazine Articles

The Keystone Vol. 47, No. 4: "A More Complete History of the Chartiers Branch" Part 1 by Doug Mahrer (pp. 34-63).
The Keystone Vol. 48, No. 1: "A More Complete History of the Chartiers Branch" Part 2 by Doug Mahrer (pp. 49-82).
The Keystone Vol. 48, No. 3: "A More Complete History of the Chartiers Branch" Part 3 by Doug Mahrer (pp. 25-58).

Forums

Yahoo! prr_panhandle_pa discussion group.

Online Videos

Pittsburgh & Ohio Central on Chartiers Branch passing by Canonsburg, PA station.
Pittsburgh & Ohio Central on Chartiers Branch passing by Canonsburg, PA station.
P&OC passing Pennsylvania Transformer Co.
P&OC passing through Canonsburg.
Drive through Canonsburg.
Pittsburgh & Ohio Central on Chartiers Branch in Houston, PA.
Pittsburgh & Ohio Central on Chartiers Branch, Greer Tunnel, near Bridgeville, PA.
AVR-3 Heading in to Washington, PA through Brady's Tunnel.
AVR-3 Cruising over Chestnut Street, Washington, PA.
Area videos.

Local Information: Carnegie, PA

Remains of Scully Yard (from where the Chartiers Branch used to break)

Local Information: Bridgeville, PA

Bridgeville and McDonald trail (former branch right-of-way)

Local Information: Canonsburg, PA

Sightseeing information in Canonsburg
Canonsburg Friends Blog
Canonsburg Buildings
Modern-day photo of the station
Various pictures of train activity in Canonsburg.
Probably a 1970's photo of the station
Canonsburgboro has a great History page about the history of Canonsburg.
Standard Chemical Company
Conrail working Pennsylvania Transformer Co.
Canonsburg's passenger station
Wikipedia entry for Canonsburg, Pennsylvania
Wikipedia entry for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

Local Information: Washington, PA

Record of O'Brien Steel Construction Company charter
William O'Brien Jr. sues O'Brien Steel Construction Company
Washington County PRR Passenger stations (past and present)
Railroad History of Washington Co, 1882
Wikipedia entry for Washington County, Pennsylvania

General Research

Wikipedia entry about the Chartiers Branch.
"1916 Pittsburgh to Columbus" description of the train ride.
Photo Search: "Ohio Central Chartiers"

Railroads

Pittsburgh & Ohio Central Railroad
Wikipedia entry about the Ohio Central Railroad System
Wikipedia entry about the Pittsburgh & Ohio Central Railroad
Wikipedia entry about the Pittsburgh Industrial Railroad
Wikipedia entry about RailTex

Regional

PRR Track Scale in Central Region
Penn Pilot Historic Aerial Photographs