Articles - Trees (method 2: moderate)
09/20/2012
I have used this method before in N-scale. It was now time to create an S-scale tree using the "stranded wire method". However, instead of using the relatively expensive and time-consuming hook-up wire (found at electronics stores, such as Radio Shack), I decided to use floral wire (any arts-and-crafts type of store will carry this in their floral depart). This particular spool is 26 gauge wire, which I bought at Hobby Lobby. I started the process by cutting a large collection of strips of wire using a pair of wire cutters. I then bundled them up in one bundle (requires a bit of patience), and started to twist them together. Your fingers will get a bit sore doing this. I kept the bottom one inch or so loose (to form the tree's exposed roots). The rest I just started bending and twisting into random branches. The bottom center five or six strands were left straight so that I could put the tree in a make-shift stand that had a hole drilled in it.
Trees (method 2: moderate)
Also bought in the same department of the aforementioned stored, brown floral tape, which is used to wrap around the wire branches and main trunk. Its purpose is to make the branches be a bit more thicker and to make sure they don't unravel. I only put tape on the twisted wire areas, starting just above the roots; single wire ends were left alone.
Trees (method 2: moderate)
Next, I hand-painted the tree with a couple of different dark colors, mostly just to experiment. When the paint was dry, I used the dry-brush method to highlight some of the trunk area using white acrylic paint. This is what you see in the photo below.
Trees (method 2: moderate)
Finally, some stretched out polyfiber with a light sprinkling of Woodland Scenic fine ground foam to give this tree a light, airy feel. When the tree finds its more permanent home, I will use Sculptamold to form the roots into the surrounding ground. However, it doesn't look too bad, as it stands right now.
Trees (method 2: moderate)