Articles - Table Saw
10/01/2002
In September of 2002 I upgraded my table saw from a Craftsman 10-inch to the Powermatic 64A table saw. The new Powermatic is a significant upgrade from the Craftsman model (both in quality and in price!). I assembled the unit in about 10 hours of work (spread over about a week and a half). It is rather like building a model railroad kit. The workmanship of the unit and the instruction manuals that come with the tool are both excellent. The instructions are clear and easy to follow. There are plenty of photos and detailed drawings. At a few points in the assembly you will need a second person to help you, but most of the assembly can be done by one individual. Some amount of tools knowledge is necessary to assemble the unit. The table saw comes with two hollow set screw wrenches, but they are fairly useless. You need to have your own tools to assemble it.

The first photo shows the individual boxes that come with the unit I ordered. In addition to the table saw itself (which includes the stand), I also ordered the 50-inch rails, the matching extension table, and a matching mobile base. We have a typical garage wherein the table saw will reside, so we needed to be able to move this thing around. The long box on the floor are the rails to the Powermatic 66 model, and we had to return those in exchange for the correct rails for the model 64A. This was a minor oops on the store's side.
Table Saw
This is the unit's motor. It weighs a ton!
Table Saw
This is the base of the table saw, upside-down. The cast metal surface is already mounted to the base. This is definitely the heaviest part. The store used a forklift to put all the parts in our truck bed, and then we uncrated them on the truck, only moving those parts that were uncrated into the garage. This is not an easy project, and two people is a must.
Table Saw
The next photo shows the table saw itself built. Shipping weight is around 610lbs.
Table Saw
I bought mobile base for this unit, but the legs don't seem to line up with the bottom of the base unit. I used some blocks of wood to level them (more on this later).
Table Saw
To match the top-dollar tool I decided to go with a top-dollar blade as well, the Forrest Woodworker II Thin Kerf. I was quite shocked at the price of these blades but people seem to be very impressed with their performance. I have now used the blade for a number of years, and I love it. Indeed well worth the investment.
Table Saw
This is a close-up of the motor assembly hanging out of the back of the unit.
Table Saw
This is the front view of the assembled table saw.
Table Saw
A close up of the safe guard and the fence.
Table Saw
To help safeguard this investment I also bought the Breathable Tool Saver Machine Cover by HTC Products, Inc. It is the "jumbo size" 72" x 112" cover. Also, to aid in preventing rust attacks on the cast iron table saw surface, I purchased "Slipit Sil-free Sliding Compound", a silicone-free lubricator.
Table Saw
One day I got frustrated with the legs of the table saw's extension table not lining up with the bottom of the mobile base. It eventually dawned on me that I had inserted one half of the mobile base into the other half upside-down! I then had to figure out how to swap the half over with this 650lb beast on top. This photos shows the careful pile of wood I used to hold the whole unit up in the air, while I flipped the base half over. After that, of course, the legs lined up perfectly!
Table Saw

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