Crystal Creek Module - Progress Report - 2005-01 Report
01/29/2005
01/29/2005
The benchwork for the Crystal Creek module is a simple box. The side panels are made out of 4" wide, 3/4"-thick Oak plywood. The top is made from 5/8" MDF (just using what I had left over in the garage). The photo below shows the parts that went into making this box. I ripped the side panels from left-overs of a 4x8 sheet. These boards make this box quite heavy.
2005-01 Report
Here's the completed box sitting on top of the bookcases. The box was assembled using wood glue only. No screws. Later on I will cover the outside edges with Masonite board and paint that.
2005-01 Report
I use Abracadata's "3D Railroad Concept and Design" as the CAD program for designing my layouts. This software application allows printing the design in 1:1 scale, meaning the design can be printed full-scale. After printing the design, I taped the various pages together and laid them out on the benchwork. This allowed me to verify that the design actually fits on the benchwork, and to get a better feel for the spur lengths. Imaginary operations can also be performed.
2005-01 Report
After deciding that I liked the design, I bought a roll of cork. I trimmed the cork to about an inch wider on all sides of the module. In this photo the cork is being glued to the module's top, and various books are used as weights.
2005-01 Report
I wanted to have two small creeks on the layout, so I cut the cork in two places, making sure not to put the creeks where turnouts are going to be. The cork will be trimmed flush with the module's edges next.
2005-01 Report
I placed the track plan on the cork, and then started taping and cutting out the track plan. What I was left with was the printed track plan taped to the cork so that I could trace the track locations. I also marked where the turnouts' throwbars are going to be. All turnouts will be #6.
2005-01 Report
The track plan has now been traced out to the cork.
2005-01 Report
I wanted to try something different this time around. I ripped 3/4" wide strips of 1/8" Masonite hardboard. Then I trimmed those and cut them to shape to form the sub-roadbed for the track. It was an interesting idea, but I'll never do that again. It is very time-consuming and hard work. However, the reason why I did it was to provide for an exceptionally smooth surface upon which to lay the ties. I will be hand-laying the track, and I have found that any irregularity in the sub-roadbed becomes hard to deal with by the time the ties and track are laid. I was going to cut the sub-roadbed where it crosses the creeks, but that turned out to be very difficult also. I just did one (see center, left in photo).
2005-01 Report
Next I painted the whole thing.
2005-01 Report
For the one bridge area I cut out, I glued some brass tubes that I cut to length and shaped to fit at the angle in which they needed to be in the creek. These will serve as culverts.
2005-01 Report