The PRR Chartiers Branch - Progress Report - 2011-10 Report
10/02/2011
10/02/2011
In addition to the recently-acquired Alco FA-2 A-B-A set, we also had visiting equipment from the Southern Pacific in the form of a steam engine.
2011-10 Report
The EMD NW2 switcher is managing it all just fine.
2011-10 Report
The Tichy Group's "Jib Crane" kit is a relatively easy and straight-forward kit to build. I left the main crane assembly loose from the base, so that it can be repositioned as desired. After clearing the flash, I glued the wench platform to the main assembly. Next, I assembled the wench, using their suggestion for using brass wire. I made sure the two halves of the wench went together correctly by placing them in a bench vise and exerting some light pressure on the parts while the glue set. I did a similar thing for assembling the two pullies. Note that one end of the chain is inserted into the bottom bolt of the top pulley (see the kit's diagram; I followed it exactly). It is a bit tedious with these small parts, but with a bit of patience it can be done. Once the chain is attached to that pulley, you can glue it to the main assembly. After the glue set, I routed the chain by guiding it in through the bottom pulley, back through the inside of the top pulley, and then around the wench. There is plenty of chain material to do this. I was trying to get the chain to go around the wench a few times, but the clearance is really tight here. I only managed to make it go around once. The final assembly was to install the crank on the base. I then painted the whole assembly using Polly Scale "Rust", being careful to avoid the chain (I wanted to leave it its original black color). The final touch was to dry-brush Floquil's "Stainless Steel". The effect I was going for was that the crane was originally stainless steel, but has become rusted over.
2011-10 Report
Because the crane is really an HO-scale model (it measures an S-scale 12 feet tall and 8 feet wide, ignoring the base), it was too short for what I intended it to be used, which was as a crane to help load flat cars or gondolas that arrive at O'Briens' factory. Also, the crane's base is about as wide as the structure's platform, which would not allow employees to get around on the platform. I decided to scratchbuild a base for the crane to raise it up high enough to be able to reach into freight cars. The base was made out of two 1/2-inch wooden blocks, glued together, that were then covered with left-over wood from the structure kit. After weathering the wood, I glued the crane to it using Eileen Tacky glue (the crane is top-heavy, so you have to have a glue that "grabs" the base right away). The last part was to build a simple staircase to the top of the base. The stairs were the most difficult part of the project! The photo below shows the crane in its position. I have not glued it to the layout so that I can move it around if I don't like this spot.
2011-10 Report