Photo Albums - PRR FM Flat Car
12/05/2017

All photos copyright © Peter Vanvliet. Photos are provided for your enjoyment, but please don't copy them and claim they are yours. Do not link to them directly, but rather link to this page instead. Click on any photo to see a much larger one. I did this so that if you are trying to research the content of the photo, you have a higher-resolution version available.

The photos on this page were taken on August 11, 2013 at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania. We only had a few hours to be able to visit the site, but I was so excited when I found a PRR FM (40-foot flat car) parked outside the gated property (little did I know at the time that there was another one inside!). The paint is fairly well worn off of the car, so I could not make out the car's number, nor that it indeed was an FM, but it looks just like it (it has the 12 stake pockets). Apparently these FM cars were used to haul the "John Bull" equipment that is in the museum. By default, the cars remained on the museum's property. Cool!
I scratchbuilt three of these cars about six months before the visit to the museum, but I remember having a hard time determining exactly how the stake pockets were shaped. Needless to say, now that I was right there with the real thing, I had to take a close-up photo of one of those.
The remainder of the photos on this page were taken of the car inside the museum's property. The wood decking was gone, and it is in pretty sad shape. But then again, this provided me with the great opportunity of photographing the framing of the car. One of the cars was built in 1902 and the other in 1906. So, I guess considering this car is over one hundred years old, it is in "good" shape.
This shot is from the inside looking toward the end sill, to hopefully show how the end sill was formed.
The brake line goes through the framing members.
A different kind of stake pocket on this car.
What remains of the lettering. In person I was able to make out "FM" on the car, but it was hard to capture that with the camera.
More piping through the frame.
I love this shot of the brake wheel.