Canonsburg Passenger Station - Planning
03/02/2014
I want to build a true-to-scale S-scale (1:64) model of the Canonsburg passenger station as it was in the summer of 1950. At that time, the station was 41 years old, and it was two years before the Pennsylvania Railroad stopped passenger service to Canonsburg (and to the entire branch line, for that matter). For more prototype information about this building, see my Canonsburg Passenger Station article.

Due to space constraints on my current layout, I am going to build a shallow-relief, track-side-only side of the building. This diagram shows the track-side profile design of the structure. The measurements are based on a standard brick-plus-one-edge-of-mortar being 9-1/8" wide, and 3-1/4" tall. Given that, and the prototype photos provided by Gary Carmichael, that is how I came up with these measurements. Living more than 1,300 miles away from this building, that is the best I can do. All height measurements of the walls do not include the 16" height of the foundation.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
In September 2010, Gary Carmichael took some photos of the actual passenger station and e-mailed them to me. He subsequently has given me permission to use his photos on this web site. I am extremely grateful to Gary for taking his time to do this. It was good to finally meet you face-to-face, Gary, at the 2013 NASG Convention in Scranton, PA.

Since I will only build the track-side view of the building, the prototype photos shown here are only of that side of the building. From left to right we start off with a 32-inch wide column. Note that unlike the walls of the building, the brick of the column doesn't go all the way to the roof, but instead there is a wooden beam between it and the roof. The enclosed area used to be an open breeze way. The breeze way was enclosed in the mid-1960s because a fitness center bought the structure and needed the space. This means that for my 1950 model it will need to be modeled with an open breeze way.

(photo: copyright © 2010 Gary Carmichael - used by permission)
Canonsburg Passenger Station
Next is, what I presume to be, the baggage area with four windows. The medium-gray concrete sheets that are in the windows were glass originally, of course. A photo taken in the 1970s shows this already having been done, so I presume this was done as part of the mid-1960s remodel of turning it into a fitness center.

(photo: copyright © 2010 Gary Carmichael - used by permission)
Canonsburg Passenger Station
The protruding, bay-window area was presumably the ticket master's office.

(photo: copyright © 2010 Gary Carmichael - used by permission)
Canonsburg Passenger Station
The right-most area I presume was the waiting area with its door and two windows. The half-moon concreted-in area above the door used to be glass. The entire space taken up by the white door frame and the door used to be two wooden doors, which had glass in the upper half of the door.

(photo: copyright © 2010 Gary Carmichael - used by permission)
Canonsburg Passenger Station