Canonsburg Passenger Station - Bay Window Construction
09/21/2012
Next, I decided to build the ticket master's bay window wall, which butts up against the wall I built already. Both side walls of this bay window area are the same, so I built both of them at the same time, except that they need to be a mirror image of each other. Construction was similar to the previous wall. For simplicity, I built the ledge across both windows, and I will cut and trim them to the correct length later.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
I've built all the walls I can fit on this single sheet of styrene, so they need to be cut loose. However, before I do that, I want to also build the decorative edges that surround the windows. However, before I can do that, I need to fill in any voids that might be visible later on. I used Bondo "Glazing & Spot Putty" to do that. By doing this before adding the decorations, I can more easily sand the Bondo areas first.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
The windows and doors have a distinctive raised edge along the outside perimeter of the top parts of the concrete insets. I used strips of 1"x4" followed by 1"x2" of styrene to form those. After thoroughly drying the glue, I went back with the back of the knife and made grooves for the cut lines. There are finial-like pieces at the bottom of these raised edges, but I could not come up with a way to simulate those in S-scale. I decided to forgo them and see if their lack is noticeable later on.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
The focus shifts to the center, bay-window wall itself; the ticket master's office. I cut the Plastruct brick wall section out, and then cut out the large central opening and the two decorative openings on either side. I then glued the wall to the styrene backing, as I did before. Previously I had cut the "concrete" styrene for the two decorative "insets" out of one piece and then came back and marked the cut-lines. This time I came up with the idea of just cutting pieces of rectangular styrene for the fill pieces. This went much faster (I could use the NWSL Chopper to cut repeatable shapes, and the final result had the cut-lines in it automatically.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
The bay window wall has a short brick wall section above the window area. I counted the bricks and cut out these three parts.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
To get the correct angles, I cut a piece of styrene that approximately matched the shape I wanted. I could then glue the three brick wall pieces together and against the styrene part. As you can see, this isn't my finest work, but I do most of my modeling late at night, shortly before bedtime, so I cut some corners here and there. I am not building a contest-quality model, just one that looks like the real thing from a couple of feet away.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
The next thing I did was to file down the "fingers" of the three wall pieces that stuck out at the joints. I then glued the wall section to the main wall. I later realized when looking at the prototype photo, that there is another section of concrete behind this wall section. I had to cut out some pieces of brick above and behind the new wall section, which you can see in the next photo. Above the brick wall section, there is a decorative concrete fascia. I am only going to approximate this profile. I started off by gluing a base piece to the top of the wall section. Note that you are looking at the bay-window wall upside-down.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
I made a section of various pieces of styrene glued together "offline". I then cut three sections, and glued them to the top of the styrene sheet shown in the above photo.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
I had used various files to come up with some sort of profile. It won't stand up when viewed up close like this, but from several feet away from the model, it gives the same illusion of the prototype's profile.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
The decorative sections were then covered with a single sheet of 0.020" styrene at the very top as the final cover.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
I constructed a similar decorative edge along the bottom of the wall section. This one is taller and wider than the one at the top. Also note that before I built that decorative section, I had cut and installed sections of styrene to fit in between the cut-outs along the sides of the wall (I left in the inside edges unfinished, because they won't be visible when the model is finished).
Canonsburg Passenger Station
Now that the decorative edge is built, I used that as a guide for cutting some 0.020" styrene sheets in U shapes, which will be concrete walls holding the windows. These are a bit flimsy, but I will reinforce them later on.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
I had not built this wall in the same manner I built the other walls (an oversight), so I had to add to the bottom of the wall the concrete decorative strip and the bottom brick wall sections. This makes them flimsy, but, again, reinforcements will be added later on. Here I am getting ready to install the bay window sections of the decorative strips. This is all just cut "by eye" and made to fit as needed. I still need to file down the fingers of the joints of the lower wall sections.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
The basic construction of the bay window wall is now complete. More work remains, but that will come later.
Canonsburg Passenger Station
This photo shows a current overall shot of what I've completed so far. I also removed the scenery base from the layout where the station will be installed. It is sitting on a sheet of foamcore board. Now you can see how little depth I have, but I was luckily able to build the bay window wall full-scale without compression, while still allowing passengers to interact with the ticketmaster without getting hit by passing trains.
Canonsburg Passenger Station