Furniture Factory - Lumber Shed
01/20/2007
The idea for this structure came from seeing a similar structure on Master Model Railroader Gil Freitag's layout here in Houston. My plan is to reproduce it in N-scale. I was able to take several photos of his structure. I have not found a prototype version of the structure, but it seems to be a realistic structure. It is an open structure for storing lumber of various shapes and sizes. It will be a two-story building. The overall dimensions are shown in the diagram below. The dashed line represents the top of the roof. The roof covers the wood storage area (top part of the diagram) and about 7 feet of the deck in front of the lumber rack. The roof line will be 30 feet above the platform. The entire structure will be scratch-built from Kappler Mill & Lumber strip wood. All wood will be stained before assembly.
Furniture Factory
The framework for the structure's platform base is made from scale 10" by 10" logs. The overall dimensions match the design diagram shown above. For the fun of it, I decided to keep track of the number of individual pieces of wood needed to build this project. As shown in the photo below, the initial count is: 8.
Furniture Factory
Next, I covered this framework with 2" by 12" boards. I didn't glue to them perfectly matched, but offset every board slightly. The dark spots in between the boards are from the metal weights I put on the boards to hold them down. I forgot, and left them on there overnight. The metal rusted a bit into the glue. However, it left a nice weathered effect. (total pieces of wood: 47)
Furniture Factory
The framework for one of the side walls is now complete. It was constructed from 8"x8" and 4"x8" scale lumber. (total pieces of wood: 81)
Furniture Factory
Next, I covered the exterior of the side wall with scale 2"x6" boards. Each are up to 16 feet tall. (total pieces of wood: 163)
Furniture Factory
This photo shows how I used metal weights to make sure the walls are glued in the correct location. If you look closely under the work-in-progress, you will see my work set-up. I build on a piece of glass. It guarantees that I have a flat, smooth surface on which to work. Under this piece of glass I placed a photo of the structure that I am "copying". The glass keeps the photo in good condition, yet it is clearly visible for quick references.
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Both side walls are glued into place. (total pieces of wood: 278)
Furniture Factory
The interior of the building is a simple framework to provide shelf-like supports for the lumber that is to be stored in the building. Although there are only four interior "walls" to build, I decided to construct a template so that they would all be the same. This photo shows the template in action. Three 8x8 columns of different lengths are glued together via four 2x6 boards. The weights are used to keep the strip wood from moving away from the template during construction. The template was made from styrene.
Furniture Factory
The 8x8 columns will bear the majority of the lumber load, but the added 4x8's provide further wall stability. One more horizontal 2x6 needs to be glued in the upper portion of the wall, and then the tops of the boards need to be trimmed to fit the roof line.
Furniture Factory
The structure is hard to see in this collection of weights and wooden blocks used to hold the four interior walls upright while the glue sets. One of the weights was used to make sure the walls were aligned properly with the existing side walls.
Furniture Factory
The next step was to install roof support beams. Using the weights, I was able to get the side of the roof, to which the boards need to be glued fairly, horizontal. After gluing them up, I placed a metal ruler to hold them all down. (total pieces of wood: 323)
Furniture Factory
The final step to completing the interior framing is to place the horizontal boards upon which the stored lumber will rest. These will also make sure the side walls are properly secured. I will glue one board against the 8x8 posts, one for each of the six levels. This photo shows the front set of boards already installed and I am gluing the bottom, first board of the middle set. Some creative use of "weights" are needed to hold the board flat and in place while the glue sets (on the one side is a pair of tweezers and on the other side is an angle jig that is part of the NWSL Chopper II tool, held up straight with two metal weights). I did say "creative"! :-)
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This overhead view shows the horizontal boards installed. (total pieces of wood: 338)
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The dramatic angle of this shot shows the rear of the building. It will soon be covered.
Furniture Factory
In the space between the 8x8 poles of the interior racks I glued some 4x8's to the rear wall. I then followed that with some small 4x8's horizontal boards to complete the wall framing. (total pieces of wood: 374)
Furniture Factory
The rear wall has been covered using the same 2x6's that were used on the side walls. (total pieces of wood: 451)
Furniture Factory
Before covering the structure with a roof, I decided to install the lumber first. That way I have access to the areas for gluing. I used two ways of building the stock supply. Some of them I built outside the structure, as shown in the photo here, and some pieces of wood were glued in-place on the racks.
Furniture Factory
No cheating here! I glued full-length boards of various shapes and sizes of lumber into the slots. Several of the ones in the photo above are glued into place.
Furniture Factory
There are 195 pieces of wood that make up the lumber supply for the Woods Furniture Company. (total pieces of wood: 646)
Furniture Factory
To reach the upper storage racks of the shed a ladder and walkway need to be constructed. The walkway itself is constructed from 3x10 boards. The structure is on its side in this photo to show the walkway already installed. I glued those boards together on the workbench. After they dried, I carefully glued the walkway to the structure. Next, I glued the walkway support boards (3x7's) under the walkway and to the structure. This helped make sure that they were in the correct location. The circled area in the photo shows the first bracket arm installed under the support board.
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The bracket arms are installed in this photo of the structure upside-down.
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The walkway, its handrail, and the ladder are now complete. (total pieces of wood: 681)
Furniture Factory
External Reference:
The most difficult decision to make was to choose the type of roof this structure should have. My intention was to have buildings that are well-maintained. I decided to match the lumber storage shed's roof to the platform covers of the main building by using corrugated metal roofing. Several of the Builders in Scale 7-1/2' panels are already installed in this photo. I cut them to length using the NWSL "The Chopper II". It cuts cleanly if you really snap the handle down quickly and firmly. The panels were glued to the roof structure using 5-minute epoxy. I needed to complete the support structure for the shorter half of the roof, which I did before I took this photo. The final count is 686 pieces of wood and 5 sheets of the corrugated metal.
Furniture Factory
After the corrugated metal sheets were installed, I used a method I saw on Allen Keller's video (#39) visiting George Selios' layout for the third time. First, I sprayed the roof with Dullcoat. Next, using his standard India Ink and alcohol mixture, combined with some Raw Sienna acrylic paint, I "painted" the entire roof. The Dullcoat gives the paint something to stick to. The lesson learned is to only put one layer on and let it completely dry. If not, the alcohol takes all the material off again. I completed the roof with several colors of weathering powders. I worked on this shed from December 19, 2006 through January 20, 2007.
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The completed structure.
Furniture Factory