Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
05/13/2014
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I bought this Pine Canyon Scale Models' kit #801S at the 2013 NASG Convention. I have seen a couple of completed structures of theirs, but I had never built one myself. Mine is going to be a typical small-town barber shop.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
This photo shows what is in the box. It is a fairly simple kit; four walls, a chimney, a power meter detail part, clear acetate for the windows, and a piece of styrene for the roof.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
The kit also comes with a sheet containing various names, the awnings, the kit's instructions, and some curtains.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
There is a bit of flash on the wall sections, so the first big project is just truing-up all the walls. In this photo is my set-up for gluing one of the side walls to the front wall. On the left side of the photo is my sanding block that I use for sanding freshly hand-laid ties. It is two pieces of MDF board glued together with a piece of sandpaper glued to the bottom. This makes for a perfectly flat surface on which to sand these wall sections, too. To actually glue the walls together, I placed them into the inside corner of a framing square, using some metal weights to hold them in place and upright. All set up on a smooth piece of glass. I then used a piece of blue masking tape to act as a clamp to hold the two walls together at the top. Very carefully I put a drop of gel superglue on the inside corner of the walls and let that set for a while. Later on I went back and put glue into the entire inside corner.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
I glued the other side wall to the front wall in the same manner. The rear wall goes in between the side walls, and I used a long piece of blue masking tape to clamp the side walls to it. Note that I used the framing square again to make sure the whole building is square. I put glue on the inside corners again, and then used Zip Kicker to have the glue cure right away, since the rear wall could move a bit.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
The distance between the side walls wasn't the same at the front of the building as it was in the rear, so the supplied piece of styrene sheet was too narrow to fit. I used some left-over 0.030" styrene sheet and traced out the inside of the building to it. I could then cut the styrene sheet, and it fit the building perfectly. The instructions show you how to install a header board (strip of styrene) on the back of the front wall so that the styrene sheet has something to lay on. I then put superglue on it and on the top of the back wall and installed the roof. The chimney was superglued to the top of the styrene roof. This is the basic structure.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
Since this is going to be a barber shop, it just has to have the typical barber sign. Miller Engineering just happened to come out with one, so I bought the smallest one they make. Since it is quite large, even for S-scale, I decided to install it in the center of the building, making it look like it was mounted to the brick fascia of the building. There is a wired plug that needs to be plugged into the sign itself to power the animation, so I had to cut a groove in the building. The material is quite thick here, so it took a bit of work to get it made. I started off with my Dremel tool and a large cut-off disc. This only get me so far, but it wasn't enough to cut all the way through. I drilled two holes using a small drill bit, and then used the blade of a coping saw to hand-carve the rest of the groove.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
The sign slides in through the groove. The groove is a bit wider than the connector, so I'll have to deal with hiding the gap later on.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
And this is what it looks like looking head-on.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
I could then attach the connector in the back, and turn the electronics on, to test my idea. It worked!
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
The next major step in this project is to paint the exterior. I painted all of the brick with Polly Scale "D&RGW Building Brown". Just one coat.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
I tried various colors, but eventually settled on Floquil's "Burlington Northern Green" for the window and door trim. I also painted a number of individual bricks using a variety of brown, red, and orange-like colors, because brick is never the same solid color. The top of the chimney was painted with Polly Scale "Grimy Black".
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
When I was happy with the overall look of the brick surfaces, I applied Polly Scale "Aged Concrete" all over the walls, small sections at a time. I let the paint sit for about 20 seconds, and then wiped it off from the brick surface. It usually required several wipes. I used a small piece of paper towel that was very lightly moistened with water (a new piece for each wipe to avoid smears). This photo shows the back wall having the mortar lines painted this way. The side of the building (with the two windows) hasn't yet had this treatment done to it.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
Here's another shot when I stopped after applying this technique to a small section of the wall. It makes quite a difference. I really liked the way the technique worked on this building.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
I covered the roof with white glue, and then sprinkled on Arizona Rock & Minerals' PRR fine ballast.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
With all of the mortar lines done, I took this on-the-layout shot to see how the building looks so far. At this point none of the light-colored areas are painted yet, and the green only has one layer applied.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
Next up is the alcohol-and-india-ink solution application. You can see here what a difference it makes when I stopped to take this photo before completing this wall. The india ink eventually settles in the various cracks and adds highlights to the building.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
I wasn't quite happy with how the photos were coming out, so I tried this shot using the camera's flash. The photo actually is a lot closer to what the model looks like to my eyes.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
Fast-forward several days. The exterior has been painted. I applied some white paint using the dry-brushing technique, to highlight the edges of the brick. It is very subtle, but it adds to the overall "aged" look of the building. Altogether, it literally took me a solid week of modeling time to do all of the painting. The light-colored areas have been painted with Polly Scale's "Aged White". The very top of the building was painted with Aged Concrete to give it a more older, unmaintained look. I also applied a second coat of green on the door and window trim. Overall I am happy with it.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
With the exterior finished for now, it is time to focus on the interior. I plan to fully decorate at least the lower floor, including interior lights. This means that the wiring for the barber shop sign has to be hidden, and routed to below the layout. This photo shows the multi-stranded cable connected to the sign. By the way, the sign has been glued to the building using Aleene's Tacky Glue.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
I decided to make an interior wall out of styrene sheet and small spacer blocks. The wall is only for the upstairs portion. It was shaped to match the roof angle.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
The spacers are to keep the wall straight, and for routing the wires out toward the back of the structure, where I should be able to better hide the cable in the back of the first floor.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop
The sheets of styrene still wanted to spread apart with the tension of the cable, so, while gluing the wall to the underside of the roof, I put these small clamps on to hold the wall in place. I then applied glued to all the joints to make sure this wall isn't going to go anywhere.

Stay tuned for the completion of the upstairs, and then the development of the lower level interior and its lights.
Raiser Sharp Barber Shop