Scratch-built Turntable - Diamond Scale N-135 Kit
06/10/2001
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In 2001 I bought the Diamond Scale Products turntable, motor kit, and indexing kit. This was a fairly pricey investment, but at the time I thought it was worth it. My first impression of Diamond Scale Products is that it is a well-run, organized, and friendly company. Ordering the products and communicating with the company was easy. They do warn in their product literature that their products are challenging to assemble. My opinion is that if they were to spend more time on improving their instructions, their kits would meet with a higher success rate. They assume the purchaser of the kit to have a full understanding of prototype terminology in identifying the parts of the kit. For a beginning modeler, this is indeed too much. I started building the turntable itself, and soon found it to be a very difficult project. The instructions that come with the kit are not easy to follow, and it truly is a "master-craftsman" type of kit. In the end I was unable to create a bridge that ran smoothly over the turntable pit rail. I gave up. Over the years I have moved, and the turntable disappeared. This page captures some photos I took of the construction of that kit.

I did not keep accurate records with these photos, so I am going from 10+ year memory here. I believe this is a photo of the turntable base as it arrived. I bought the 135-foot (N-scale) turntable to be able to handle my larger steam engines with their tenders attached.
Scratch-built Turntable
Using several washes, I stained the base wall and the rail area.
Scratch-built Turntable
This shows the bridge constructed as per the instructions. It was very difficult to get the bridge to be perfectly perpendicular to the drive rod.
Scratch-built Turntable
I painted the bridge surface and the ties (at this point in time I had never done any hand-laying of track).
Scratch-built Turntable
This is the support system under the base, which makes sure that the cylinder stays straight.
Scratch-built Turntable
I installed the bridge side panels.
Scratch-built Turntable
The drive motor detail is just glued to the underside of the bridge ends.
Scratch-built Turntable
I used rubber cement to attach the rails (I should have used five-minute epoxy). I had a hard time getting the rails to sit correctly on the bridge. This was the last photo I took, so I presume I gave up on the kit after this.
Scratch-built Turntable